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Arctic challenge

PUBLISHED: 13:34 05 March 2008 | UPDATED: 14:29 07 July 2010

MID-NORFOLK action man George Bullard is trudging along the countryside dragging tyres behind him as he prepares for a record-breaking challenge.

Having swum the English Channel in 2003, then around Manhattan in 2004 and Barbados in 2006, he is in training for a two-man, 1,400-mile unsupported Arctic adventure.

MID-NORFOLK action man George Bullard is trudging along the countryside dragging tyres behind him as he prepares for a record-breaking challenge.

Having swum the English Channel in 2003, then around Manhattan in 2004 and Barbados in 2006, he is in training for a two-man, 1,400-mile unsupported Arctic adventure.

George, 20, hopes it will become the longest unsupported polar journey in history.

And the tyres he has been tugging around with him for the past two months provide a vital part of his training.

George, from Gressenhall, and

co-explorer Alex Hibbert, 21, from Hampshire, set off on Saturday, March 22. The trip is expected to to last about 100 days and will see them trekking across Greenland's polar ice-cap, pulling their supplies.

Their packs will include a tent, 6,000 calories of dehydrated food a day, a rifle - just in case they are attacked by a polar bear - sleeping gear and an iPod, complete with audio versions of television's Blackadder series.

George hopes to raise money for Breast Cancer Haven, a charity that provides free support, information, advice and therapies for people affected by breast cancer, including his aunt.

He said: “I'm going to go out there and survive. In a way it is a massive mental game; the distance is mind-boggling. Every day you look forward to speaking on the radio and every week you look forward to getting rid of 10kg in weight.”

Besides the tyre treks, his training has involved running, cycling and swimming. George and Alex have some crevasse rescue training to look forward to as well.

The journey will take them to Greenland because the ice conditions are more reliable and less dangerous than the North Pole. They will be using satellite radios to submit daily information to an online blog.

George picked up the polar region exploration bug last year after he went on a two-month expedition with the British Schools Exploring Society, part of the Royal Geographical Society, discovering a colony of penguins and a new plant in the sub-Antarctic.

“It is the sheer isolation of it,” he said. “It is a feeling I've never experienced before. There is just no one there for hundreds, thousands of miles.”

When he returns, George will be offering talks on the trip to school pupils in return for them holding a mufti day to raise cash for Breast Cancer Haven.

In September he hopes to start a degree in biological science and management at the University of Edinburgh.

To track the adventure visit www.tisogreenland.com

To sponsor George go to www.justgiving.com/georgebullard

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