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Meat plant plan may be blocked

PUBLISHED: 14:39 30 July 2008 | UPDATED: 14:39 07 July 2010

A controversial scheme to run a meat rendering plant in mid-Norfolk is set to be blocked because of lack of evidence it would not create noise and odour pollution.

A controversial scheme to run a meat rendering plant in mid-Norfolk is set to be blocked because of lack of evidence it would not create noise and odour pollution.

Poultry giant Banham Compost wants to process animal by-products at its plant at Great Witchingham, 10 miles north west of Norwich.

But now Broadland Council says it is minded to refuse a bid by the firm to get a Pollution Prevention and Control licence (PPC) which would allow it to start operating at the site. The council is now going through a consultation process on its draft decision.

The firm is already consulting legal experts over a bid to vary its planning permission at the site, refused earlier this year ­- but said on Monday it would continue to work to get the plant running.

The latest decision, out to consultation until August 15, was welcomed by campaigners.

Tania Spelacy of the parish council said: “Villagers have always claimed the development would cause odour and noise as well as harm to the wildlife and ecology of the Wensum Valley.

“Although the final decision has yet to be made and the unauthorised buildings and equipment remain on site, this is proof Broadland Council has indeed acted to protect residents and this beautiful part of the Wensum Valley.”

Concerns raised by the council over the PPC were that Banham had not demonstrated significant pollution by odour would not occur and use of a generator would not pollute, create excess emissions or be used inefficiently.

The facility would process turkey, chickens, ducks, fish and other sea animals into tallow, or oils, and meal to be sold for use within various industries.

On Monday Banham said it would work to meet the issues raised in the PPC application so it could continue the scheme and it was in legal discussions over planning permission and a possible appeal.

In March Broadland Council stopped short of taking enforcement action against Banham based on the likelihood of an appeal against the refusal of planning permission on the scheme, which was larger than agreed 2003 plans.

The final decision on the PPC will be made after the consultation ends on August 15.

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