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Medieval silver declared treasure

PUBLISHED: 06:02 03 January 2010 | UPDATED: 15:35 07 July 2010

Historical items discovered around the county by amateur metal detector enthusiasts were declared to be treasure at an inquest in Norwich last week.

The inquest heard that a medieval silver buckle was found in Postwick, a silver hawking vervel in Great Fransham and an Anglo-Saxon pyramidal mount on Happisburgh beach, all by separate detectors.

Historical items discovered around the county by amateur metal detector enthusiasts were declared to be treasure at an inquest in Norwich last week.

The inquest heard that a medieval silver buckle was found in Postwick, a silver hawking vervel in Great Fransham and an Anglo-Saxon pyramidal mount on Happisburgh beach, all by separate detectors.

Declared treasure was a post-medieval silver hawking vervel, which was attached to the legs of hawks to identify their owners.

The piece is unique because it bears the name and village of the owner: “W SPRYNG” is engraved on one side and “OF PAKENHAM” on the other.

But despite its origins, the piece was found more than 30 miles north in Great Fransham.

A medieval silver buckle which dates back to the 14th or 15th century, found in Postwick by David Soanes, was also declared treasure.

By far the oldest piece was the pyramidal mount, which Dr Sonja Marzinzik of the British Museum said would have been used to secure a sword strap around the waist.

The piece was made of silver, although it was heavily corroded, and set with a solitary square garnet.

It was found by Terry Searle, of Canvey Island in Essex, while he was using his metal detector on Happisburgh Beach.

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