Melton Constable homes plan backed

A plan to build 38 homes in Melton Constable was given the thumbs up by planning councillors yesterday, but there are still a number of hurdles to be cleared before the development can go ahead.

A plan to build 38 homes in Melton Constable was given the thumbs up by planning councillors last week, but there are still a number of hurdles to be cleared before the development can go ahead.

The housing plan has split the community, angering many villagers concerned with road safety, over-development, flooding and loss of green space.

A bid by opponents to get part of the site protected by seeking to get it 'village green status' is also in the melting pot.

Members of North Norfolk District Council's west area development control committee agreed to give their blessing to the plan subject to a number of conditions including the developer's financial contributions to local services and making sure half the homes are built as 'affordable'.


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And while the village green application was not considered as part of the planning decision, it could come back to halt the development because it will run on as a separate strand.

Speaking against the plan, Monica Wiedman said the development was 'unacceptable, even with the most sympathetic design' and would lead to the destruction of the village's character.

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And addressing statements from landowners Melton Constable Country Club claiming the development was necessary to generate funds to secure the future of the 300-member club, she added: 'Using the financial situation as a tear jerker is laughable.'

Catherine McKenzie-Dodds, chairman of Melton Constable Community Association, said the planning application lacked necessary information and suggested it could be taken to judicial review if passed.

Speaking in favour of the plans, chairman of the country club Adrian Loynes said the project would deliver badly needed affordable housing, while making the club viable and preventing the loss of five full and part time jobs.

Club officials had thought long and hard how to raise the necessary money for urgent repairs and improvements to meet modern standards, said Mr Loynes, and gaining permission for a housing development was the only realistic option.

Members voted six to three in support of the application.

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