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Norfolk father of Lockerbie victim supports bomber release

PUBLISHED: 16:53 13 August 2009 | UPDATED: 15:21 07 July 2010

Kathryn Cross

The Norfolk father of a victim of the Lockerbie bombing has given his support to the possible imminent release of the man convicted of the atrocity 20 years ago.

The Norfolk father of a victim of the Lockerbie bombing has given his support to the possible imminent release of the man convicted of the atrocity 20 years ago.

Martin Cadman, who lives in Burnham Market and lost his 32-year-old son Bill on Pan Am Flight 103, said he still believed Libyan Adelbaset Ali Mohmed Al Megrahi played no part in the disaster which claimed 270 lives when the plane blew up over the Scottish town of Lockerbie.

“His trial was a farce and the fact he was convicted has hampered any further investigation into those people who were really involved,” he said.

“It has taken the focus off what really happened and 20 years on we are no nearer the truth.”

Mr Cadman said it was possible that the blame had been put on Megrahi as a scapegoat and it may not have even been a Libyan responsibility but a revenge attack for the fact that a few months earlier an American warship had blown up an Iranian airbus taking pilgrims to Mecca.

“We could be blaming the wrong country entirely,” he said. “I don't think Megrahi played any part in this at all and we are not even certain it was a bomb that brought down the plane. It has all been glossed over and a terrible mistake has been made.”

Some US relatives of victims have expressed their anger over Megrahi's possible release on compassionate grounds as he has terminal prostate cancer.

The Scottish government insisted no decision has yet been taken but there is mounting speculation that Megrahi, who was convicted in 2001 and is serving a life term with a minimum of 27 years, could go free in time for the start of Ramadan.

Some are even sceptical of his reported illness.

But Mr Cadman said he was in no doubt that Megrahi was genuinely ill.

“I can't imagine why people would suggest he was not ill as I don't think there is any doubt. I know people who have been to see him and they are convinced.

“I also think it is a deplorable attitude to think people believe letting Megrahi go free would send a message to Colonel Gaddafi that he has somehow won.”

Megrahi is appealing against his conviction for the bombing, a fact that Mr Cadman still finds puzzling.

“The fact that an appeal is allowed implies that there is doubt about guilt. And yet the whole process goes on as though the man is still guilty until he is proved innocent. I find that a rather odd way of going about things.”

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