Money raised for defibrillator after heart attack at pub

Broderick Brett, from Honingham, Norwich, took part in sober October to help fund the defibrillator.

Broderick Brett took part in sober October to help fund the defibrillator. - Credit: Broderick Brett took part in sober October to help fund the defibrillator.

After witnessing a heart attack at his local, one man decided to fundraise so the pub could have its own defibrillator.

Broderick Brett, from Honingham, took part in sober October to help pay for the life-saving equipment at The Bell Inn at Barnham Broom, after witnessing a suspected heart attack last year. 

Mr Brett was at the Bell last July when he witnessed a woman collapse from a suspected heart attack. He and his friends jumped into action, as Glen Ireland put her in the recovery position, while Mr Brett and Johnny Gooch went to fetch the nearest defibrillator which was a mile away.

Despite it being a five-minute drive, Mr Brett said it felt like forever, with the time to gain the access number and the return journey - thankfully the ambulance came and the lady in question recovered.

However, this played on Mr Brett’s mind, regarding the amount of time it had taken to collect the unit: “It could well have turned out to be a different outcome. A fair amount of the customers, including myself, are on the other side of 50 and may at some point require the use of such equipment.”

Broderick Brett (left) and Glen Ireland (right) both helped on the night of the incident and in the fundraising. 

Broderick Brett (left) and Glen Ireland (right) both helped on the night of the incident and in the fundraising. - Credit: Broderick Brett took part in sober October to help fund the defibrillator.

He decided to do Sober October in order to raise funds for purchasing another unit. With help from the local community, fundraisers at the pub, and work colleagues, they raised over £1,500.

Lisa Oakey, who co-owns the pub, only opened it back in May last year as restrictions eased. 

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She said the thought of a defibrillator was not there when they first opened three months prior, but after the incident, said it was needed: “It was the wait, we had a first aider here, and I have been a first responder, so we knew we could help this lady, but were waiting for the defib, which we thought would be a simple five minutes in the car.

“It took so much longer because it took ages to get the number through to unlock it. So that's what spurred us on to get one here.” 

Mr Brett added his thanks to Jayne Biggs and the Heart to Heart charity for their advice and supplying the unit which is now in pride of place on the front wall of the pub. 

Mrs Oakey added that access codes for the machine are with the pub, registered with the emergency services, as well as the post office and with people who have first aid at work certificates.